1. kenyatta:

ericmortensen:

Everybody tweeted about Sharknado. Nobody watched it. 

I reblogged this earlier today without commentary and that may have been a mistake.
Last night #Sharknado trended on Twitter creating a significant amount of tweet volume for the show. Despite this, The Atlantic points out that it did so-so in ratings when compared to a show like Game of Thrones. (But for a $200,000 production investment, as Adam notes, SyFy was probably very happy with how Sharknado performed.) 
Why would anyone compare the Twitter volume of Sharknado to Game of Thrones in the first place? Well, you do it if you want to say that tweets don’t equal ratings and show that Social Media sucks.
But of course, that’s just silly.
If you don’t understand how social works in television, the above chart by The Atlantic could be very misleading.
If you want to understand the connection between TV and Twitter, you need to understand where the numbers come from and then you need to understand the trend.
How To Understand The Numbers.
Measuring social activity around TV can be tough and almost everybody underreports. Some audience use hashtags. Others do not. Some will talk about a character or a plot point and not mention the name of the show. And not everybody tweets about a show during premiere because not everybody watches a show the same day. All of this raises questions about the numbers being shown above.
Are these the number of tweets during premiere or throughout the whole night?
Is this measuring the use of the hashtag #Sharknado vs hashtag #RedWedding? Does it also include “shark & tornado” “sharks & tornado” #GameofThrones #GoT “Game of Thrones” “Stark Family” “Wedding”?
Game of Thrones is heavily DVR’d which means that HBO is likely to see a significant amount of their total activity in Live + 3 days that could almost double the GoT total. While I don’t know SyFy’s expectations around this movie, I wouldn’t think DVR activity (or post-premiere tweets) would be high. 
How To Understand The Trend.
People tweeted about #Sharknado because it’s ridiculous. Even if someone isn’t watching #Sharknado, seeing other people tweet about #Sharknado is going to make you tweet about the ridiculousness of the word #Sharknado.
It doesn’t take a whole lot to get something to trend when you’ve bought the Twitter promoted trend for the evening (I’m fairly certain SyFy did.) If you don’t know how promoted trends work, think of it as a way of first bootstrapping awareness for a thing and then guiding activity around the conversation that results from getting their attention.
If they did buy the trend that means that far more people were exposed to the #Sharknado hashtag than were actually watching the show. This meant that the chances of people tweeting about #Sharknado because they saw a ridiculous hashtag named “#sharknado” was pretty damn high.
Layer all of this activity on top of one another and you can easily generate enough volume for an organic trend.
Sharknado did just fine but Game of Thrones is actually the more “social” show.
The real story in comparing the social activity around GoT and Sharknado can be found in looking at the conversation over a longer period of time.
Two days from now, nobody will care about Sharknado. They won’t tweet about the characters, they won’t have long forum discussions about the plot points or storyline. Perhaps SyFy can build curousity off of the event of Sharknado but they can’t build loyalty in any significant way.
The tweet volume for GoT, however, is high during the season, and it still does well in the offseason. It is a show that people will talk about year round because it is a good show with compelling characters and a great storyline. And that’s the kind of thing you can build a franchise around.

    kenyatta:

    ericmortensen:

    Everybody tweeted about Sharknado. Nobody watched it. 

    I reblogged this earlier today without commentary and that may have been a mistake.

    Last night #Sharknado trended on Twitter creating a significant amount of tweet volume for the show. Despite this, The Atlantic points out that it did so-so in ratings when compared to a show like Game of Thrones(But for a $200,000 production investment, as Adam notes, SyFy was probably very happy with how Sharknado performed.) 

    Why would anyone compare the Twitter volume of Sharknado to Game of Thrones in the first place? Well, you do it if you want to say that tweets don’t equal ratings and show that Social Media sucks.

    But of course, that’s just silly.

    If you don’t understand how social works in television, the above chart by The Atlantic could be very misleading.

    If you want to understand the connection between TV and Twitter, you need to understand where the numbers come from and then you need to understand the trend.

    How To Understand The Numbers.

    Measuring social activity around TV can be tough and almost everybody underreports. Some audience use hashtags. Others do not. Some will talk about a character or a plot point and not mention the name of the show. And not everybody tweets about a show during premiere because not everybody watches a show the same day. All of this raises questions about the numbers being shown above.

    Are these the number of tweets during premiere or throughout the whole night?

    Is this measuring the use of the hashtag #Sharknado vs hashtag #RedWedding? Does it also include “shark & tornado” “sharks & tornado” #GameofThrones #GoT “Game of Thrones” “Stark Family” “Wedding”?

    Game of Thrones is heavily DVR’d which means that HBO is likely to see a significant amount of their total activity in Live + 3 days that could almost double the GoT total. While I don’t know SyFy’s expectations around this movie, I wouldn’t think DVR activity (or post-premiere tweets) would be high. 

    How To Understand The Trend.

    People tweeted about #Sharknado because it’s ridiculous. Even if someone isn’t watching #Sharknado, seeing other people tweet about #Sharknado is going to make you tweet about the ridiculousness of the word #Sharknado.

    It doesn’t take a whole lot to get something to trend when you’ve bought the Twitter promoted trend for the evening (I’m fairly certain SyFy did.) If you don’t know how promoted trends work, think of it as a way of first bootstrapping awareness for a thing and then guiding activity around the conversation that results from getting their attention.

    If they did buy the trend that means that far more people were exposed to the #Sharknado hashtag than were actually watching the show. This meant that the chances of people tweeting about #Sharknado because they saw a ridiculous hashtag named “#sharknado” was pretty damn high.

    Layer all of this activity on top of one another and you can easily generate enough volume for an organic trend.

    Sharknado did just fine but Game of Thrones is actually the more “social” show.

    The real story in comparing the social activity around GoT and Sharknado can be found in looking at the conversation over a longer period of time.

    Two days from now, nobody will care about Sharknado. They won’t tweet about the characters, they won’t have long forum discussions about the plot points or storyline. Perhaps SyFy can build curousity off of the event of Sharknado but they can’t build loyalty in any significant way.

    The tweet volume for GoT, however, is high during the season, and it still does well in the offseason. It is a show that people will talk about year round because it is a good show with compelling characters and a great storyline. And that’s the kind of thing you can build a franchise around.

    Reblogged from: kenyatta
  2. unionmetrics:

    Game of Thrones season 3 premiered on HBO last night, and Tumblr’s conversation about it spiked for the occasion: out of 118k GoT-related posts in the past month, nearly a quarter (just over 23%) were made the night of the premiere.

    Overall, 180k Tumblr users posted, reblogged and liked GoT posts on March 31st, earning a total of 354.5k notes so far. 

    What were some of the popular tags? The name of the show and its most common abbreviation - GoT - took the top two spots and were followed with a mixture of character names (Daenerys Targaryen, Sansa Stark, Jon Snow), the actors who portray those characters (Emilia Clark as Daenerys, Sophie Turner as Sansa, and Kit Harington as Jon Snow; see the full cast and crew here), and the name and abbreviation for the book series the show is based on (A Song of Ice and Fire or ASOIAF, written by George R.R. Martin). 

    Are you a Game of Thrones fan? Did you watch the show yesterday? And more importantly, did you post about it on Tumblr?

    Reblog and talk about it, and Tyrion won’t have to slap you. 

    Reblogged from: unionmetrics
  3. Watch An Extended ‘Game Of Thrones’ Season 3 Trailer With Extra Tyrion Quips, Sexy Sex
Great trailer. Can’t wait for season 3.
  4. parislemon:

laughingsquid:

Game of Thrones Season 3 Trailer & Posters Showing Cast’s Dark Side

4 weeks…

YES.
    Reblogged from: parislemon
  5. Initially, we didn’t know if anyone would watch Game of Thrones, but if they did, we knew they’d be drawn to Tyrion because he’s such a great character, and Peter’s so perfect to play him. When we were courting him, we said, ‘You will win an Emmy for this.’ I’m sure he thought we were bullshitting.
    From a fascinating interview about the story behind the Game of Thrones episode “Blackwater”, The Year’s Best Television Episode in GQ
  6. ryanhatesthis:

    inebriatedpony:

    rhaegartargaryen:

    wicnet:

    neairaisnotstudying:

    ASoIaF castlescapes according to Ted Nasmith (they’re all paintings)

    1 The Red Keep
    2. Casterly Rock
    3. Dragonstone
    4. The Eyrie
    5. Harrenhal
    6. Highgarden
    7. Riverrun
    8. Storm’s End
    9. Sunspear
    10. Winterfell

    He’s also done:

    Castle Black and the Wall

    Eastwatch-by-the-Sea

    Pyke

    The Hightower at Oldtown

    The Twins

    love this

    Reblogged from: ryanhatesthis
  7. Game of Thrones opening sung by a cat

Jenn Deering Davis

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