I'm Jenn. I post things here so I don't distract my coworkers too much in Campfire.
I live in San Francisco and help run a company called Union Metrics.

Posts Tagged: television

"True Detective is the most compelling series currently on television, one that boasts an almost embarrassing array of riches: a mesmerizing performance by current Hollywood It Man Matthew McConaughey; an only marginally less notable turn by co-star Woody Harrelson; an intricate structure and hyper-literate dialogue by writer/creator Nic Pizzolatto; big-screen-worthy direction by Cary Joji Fukunaga; and an anthology format that has the potential to help change the way high-end television is produced."

unionmetrics:

Want more from last night’s MTV VMAs? 
On Twitter: 
3.9 million tweets
1.3 million contributors
The most retweeted tweet was from Niall Horan of One Direction (1D) with 56k retweets and 2k replies
Most buzzed-about musicians: One Direction, Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, Macklemore, Justin Timberlake
On Tumblr: 
2.1 million posts 
1.9 million likes
1.1 million contributors
The most reblogged post was this one from gamebrah with 85k reblogs and 60k likes
Most buzzed-about musicians: Miley Cyrus, One Direction, Lady Gaga, ‘N Sync, Taylor Swift
GIF credit: MTV. 

Here’s more of our social data on last night’s VMAs. Tumblr just couldn’t get enough of Miley’s completely appropriate and not-at-all-uncomfortable “twerking”. 

unionmetrics:

Want more from last night’s MTV VMAs? 

On Twitter: 

  • 3.9 million tweets
  • 1.3 million contributors
  • The most retweeted tweet was from Niall Horan of One Direction (1D) with 56k retweets and 2k replies
  • Most buzzed-about musicians: One Direction, Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, Macklemore, Justin Timberlake

On Tumblr: 

  • 2.1 million posts 
  • 1.9 million likes
  • 1.1 million contributors
  • The most reblogged post was this one from gamebrah with 85k reblogs and 60k likes
  • Most buzzed-about musicians: Miley Cyrus, One Direction, Lady Gaga, ‘N Sync, Taylor Swift

GIF credit: MTV

Here’s more of our social data on last night’s VMAs. Tumblr just couldn’t get enough of Miley’s completely appropriate and not-at-all-uncomfortable “twerking”. 

Source: unionmetrics

"Tumblr was nearly as busy as Twitter during MTV’s Video Music Awards on Sunday when it came to the sheer number of content contributors, per Union Metrics, a company that offers analytics for both platforms. The San Francisco tech firm says 1.1 million Tumblr users posted content with VMA-related keywords yesterday, while 1.3 million folks on Twitter did the same. Those figures may surprise marketers who view Twitter as the undisputed, dominant, social-media companion for TV watchers."

Source: adweek.com

unionmetrics:

We’re proposing two panels for next year’s SXSW Interactive conference, and if you like the sound of either one, we’d love your vote! 
Last year, Jenn Deering Davis, one of our founders, did a talk about how Twitter has changed how we watch TV. (Miss it? Listen to it here.) Next year, Jenn wants to expand to talk about everything From Tweets to GIFs: How Social TV is Evolving.
So why should you vote for her proposal?  
1. What inspired/drove you to propose a panel around this subject? 
I’ve worked in social media for ages (well, for as long as we’ve called it that). I love television. There are some very interesting things happening in the intersection of those two worlds and I enjoy exploring them at events like SXSW. A lot has changed in the media landscape in the past few years, and SXSW is the perfect place to talk about those changes. 
2. What makes you qualified to discuss it? 
We’ve been working with TV, film and other entertainment companies for several years at Union Metrics, so I’ve seen a lot of this first-hand with our customers. I also have a PhD in communication technologies and, if you can believe it, actually spent some time in grad school studying the rhetoric of pop culture. You might say this is my legerdemain. Bailiwick. Whatever.
3. Why should people come to your panel? 
Because it’ll be fun! Seriously though, I got great feedback from last year’s presentation on a similar topic, which I’ve incorporated into this new talk. I’m adding in new examples and updating the content to reflect the changes in social media marketing since last March. It’s going to be great!
4. What would you hope attendees take away from your panel? 
At the very least, attendees will hear some good stories and examples of how TV shows use social media. But hopefully they’ve gained some ideas for how they can implement these kind of strategies for their own brands, even if they’re not in entertainment. 

Yep, you should definitely vote for my SXSW panel.

unionmetrics:

We’re proposing two panels for next year’s SXSW Interactive conference, and if you like the sound of either one, we’d love your vote! 

Last year, Jenn Deering Davis, one of our founders, did a talk about how Twitter has changed how we watch TV. (Miss it? Listen to it here.) Next year, Jenn wants to expand to talk about everything From Tweets to GIFs: How Social TV is Evolving.

So why should you vote for her proposal?  

1. What inspired/drove you to propose a panel around this subject? 

I’ve worked in social media for ages (well, for as long as we’ve called it that). I love television. There are some very interesting things happening in the intersection of those two worlds and I enjoy exploring them at events like SXSW. A lot has changed in the media landscape in the past few years, and SXSW is the perfect place to talk about those changes. 

2. What makes you qualified to discuss it? 

We’ve been working with TV, film and other entertainment companies for several years at Union Metrics, so I’ve seen a lot of this first-hand with our customers. I also have a PhD in communication technologies and, if you can believe it, actually spent some time in grad school studying the rhetoric of pop culture. You might say this is my legerdemain. Bailiwick. Whatever.

3. Why should people come to your panel? 

Because it’ll be fun! Seriously though, I got great feedback from last year’s presentation on a similar topic, which I’ve incorporated into this new talk. I’m adding in new examples and updating the content to reflect the changes in social media marketing since last March. It’s going to be great!

4. What would you hope attendees take away from your panel? 

At the very least, attendees will hear some good stories and examples of how TV shows use social media. But hopefully they’ve gained some ideas for how they can implement these kind of strategies for their own brands, even if they’re not in entertainment. 

Yep, you should definitely vote for my SXSW panel.

Source: unionmetrics

unionmetrics:

Tune in to TV on Tumblr
In the past month alone, there have been 183.6k posts and 5.5 million notes about TV on Tumblr, from 2.3 million Tumblr users. That’s a huge community of television fans.
According to the tags, The Daily Show and Doctor Who are the shows people are talking about this summer.
As for the most popular official show and network blogs, it looks like Comedy Central, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Doctor Who, and Hannibal took those honors this month. 
#gif is the second most popular tag in the Tumblr TV conversation (after #television itself). TV lends itself so well to GIFing (both live and after-the-fact) interesting, funny or unexpected moments, so the fact that photo posts dominate TV content won’t surprise anyone. 

Read the rest on the Union Metrics Tumblr. 

unionmetrics:

Tune in to TV on Tumblr

In the past month alone, there have been 183.6k posts and 5.5 million notes about TV on Tumblr, from 2.3 million Tumblr users. That’s a huge community of television fans.

According to the tags, The Daily Show and Doctor Who are the shows people are talking about this summer.

As for the most popular official show and network blogs, it looks like Comedy Central, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Doctor Who, and Hannibal took those honors this month. 

#gif is the second most popular tag in the Tumblr TV conversation (after #television itself). TV lends itself so well to GIFing (both live and after-the-fact) interesting, funny or unexpected moments, so the fact that photo posts dominate TV content won’t surprise anyone. 

Read the rest on the Union Metrics Tumblr. 

Source: unionmetrics

kenyatta:

ericmortensen:

Everybody tweeted about Sharknado. Nobody watched it. 

I reblogged this earlier today without commentary and that may have been a mistake.
Last night #Sharknado trended on Twitter creating a significant amount of tweet volume for the show. Despite this, The Atlantic points out that it did so-so in ratings when compared to a show like Game of Thrones. (But for a $200,000 production investment, as Adam notes, SyFy was probably very happy with how Sharknado performed.) 
Why would anyone compare the Twitter volume of Sharknado to Game of Thrones in the first place? Well, you do it if you want to say that tweets don’t equal ratings and show that Social Media sucks.
But of course, that’s just silly.
If you don’t understand how social works in television, the above chart by The Atlantic could be very misleading.
If you want to understand the connection between TV and Twitter, you need to understand where the numbers come from and then you need to understand the trend.
How To Understand The Numbers.
Measuring social activity around TV can be tough and almost everybody underreports. Some audience use hashtags. Others do not. Some will talk about a character or a plot point and not mention the name of the show. And not everybody tweets about a show during premiere because not everybody watches a show the same day. All of this raises questions about the numbers being shown above.
Are these the number of tweets during premiere or throughout the whole night?
Is this measuring the use of the hashtag #Sharknado vs hashtag #RedWedding? Does it also include “shark & tornado” “sharks & tornado” #GameofThrones #GoT “Game of Thrones” “Stark Family” “Wedding”?
Game of Thrones is heavily DVR’d which means that HBO is likely to see a significant amount of their total activity in Live + 3 days that could almost double the GoT total. While I don’t know SyFy’s expectations around this movie, I wouldn’t think DVR activity (or post-premiere tweets) would be high. 
How To Understand The Trend.
People tweeted about #Sharknado because it’s ridiculous. Even if someone isn’t watching #Sharknado, seeing other people tweet about #Sharknado is going to make you tweet about the ridiculousness of the word #Sharknado.
It doesn’t take a whole lot to get something to trend when you’ve bought the Twitter promoted trend for the evening (I’m fairly certain SyFy did.) If you don’t know how promoted trends work, think of it as a way of first bootstrapping awareness for a thing and then guiding activity around the conversation that results from getting their attention.
If they did buy the trend that means that far more people were exposed to the #Sharknado hashtag than were actually watching the show. This meant that the chances of people tweeting about #Sharknado because they saw a ridiculous hashtag named “#sharknado” was pretty damn high.
Layer all of this activity on top of one another and you can easily generate enough volume for an organic trend.
Sharknado did just fine but Game of Thrones is actually the more “social” show.
The real story in comparing the social activity around GoT and Sharknado can be found in looking at the conversation over a longer period of time.
Two days from now, nobody will care about Sharknado. They won’t tweet about the characters, they won’t have long forum discussions about the plot points or storyline. Perhaps SyFy can build curousity off of the event of Sharknado but they can’t build loyalty in any significant way.
The tweet volume for GoT, however, is high during the season, and it still does well in the offseason. It is a show that people will talk about year round because it is a good show with compelling characters and a great storyline. And that’s the kind of thing you can build a franchise around.

kenyatta:

ericmortensen:

Everybody tweeted about Sharknado. Nobody watched it. 

I reblogged this earlier today without commentary and that may have been a mistake.

Last night #Sharknado trended on Twitter creating a significant amount of tweet volume for the show. Despite this, The Atlantic points out that it did so-so in ratings when compared to a show like Game of Thrones(But for a $200,000 production investment, as Adam notes, SyFy was probably very happy with how Sharknado performed.) 

Why would anyone compare the Twitter volume of Sharknado to Game of Thrones in the first place? Well, you do it if you want to say that tweets don’t equal ratings and show that Social Media sucks.

But of course, that’s just silly.

If you don’t understand how social works in television, the above chart by The Atlantic could be very misleading.

If you want to understand the connection between TV and Twitter, you need to understand where the numbers come from and then you need to understand the trend.

How To Understand The Numbers.

Measuring social activity around TV can be tough and almost everybody underreports. Some audience use hashtags. Others do not. Some will talk about a character or a plot point and not mention the name of the show. And not everybody tweets about a show during premiere because not everybody watches a show the same day. All of this raises questions about the numbers being shown above.

Are these the number of tweets during premiere or throughout the whole night?

Is this measuring the use of the hashtag #Sharknado vs hashtag #RedWedding? Does it also include “shark & tornado” “sharks & tornado” #GameofThrones #GoT “Game of Thrones” “Stark Family” “Wedding”?

Game of Thrones is heavily DVR’d which means that HBO is likely to see a significant amount of their total activity in Live + 3 days that could almost double the GoT total. While I don’t know SyFy’s expectations around this movie, I wouldn’t think DVR activity (or post-premiere tweets) would be high. 

How To Understand The Trend.

People tweeted about #Sharknado because it’s ridiculous. Even if someone isn’t watching #Sharknado, seeing other people tweet about #Sharknado is going to make you tweet about the ridiculousness of the word #Sharknado.

It doesn’t take a whole lot to get something to trend when you’ve bought the Twitter promoted trend for the evening (I’m fairly certain SyFy did.) If you don’t know how promoted trends work, think of it as a way of first bootstrapping awareness for a thing and then guiding activity around the conversation that results from getting their attention.

If they did buy the trend that means that far more people were exposed to the #Sharknado hashtag than were actually watching the show. This meant that the chances of people tweeting about #Sharknado because they saw a ridiculous hashtag named “#sharknado” was pretty damn high.

Layer all of this activity on top of one another and you can easily generate enough volume for an organic trend.

Sharknado did just fine but Game of Thrones is actually the more “social” show.

The real story in comparing the social activity around GoT and Sharknado can be found in looking at the conversation over a longer period of time.

Two days from now, nobody will care about Sharknado. They won’t tweet about the characters, they won’t have long forum discussions about the plot points or storyline. Perhaps SyFy can build curousity off of the event of Sharknado but they can’t build loyalty in any significant way.

The tweet volume for GoT, however, is high during the season, and it still does well in the offseason. It is a show that people will talk about year round because it is a good show with compelling characters and a great storyline. And that’s the kind of thing you can build a franchise around.

Source: ericmortensen

comedycentral:

John Oliver kicked off his guest-hosting stint on The Daily Show last night, and his fellow correspondents were there to offer plenty of encouraging words.

Click here to watch.

Awesome. Particularly that glass ceiling bit. 

Source: comedycentral

unionmetrics:

Arrested Development: talk on Twitter & Tumblr 
One minute after midnight (PDT!) on Sunday, May 26th, Arrested Development (AD) fans will be gathered around their glowing computer screens as the entire fourth season premieres on Netflix. Excited fans have been discussing the countdown to their streaming binges on Twitter and Tumblr, and as Gene Parmesan is unavailable to disclose their discussions with you, you’ll just have to stick with us instead. (Although it’s entirely possible we’re just him in costume.)  
Tumblr
As of yesterday- four days away from the season four premiere- 486.6k Tumblr users generated 19.1k posts with over 1 million notes, since we started tracking on April 22nd. Posts about Arrested Development on Tumblr spiked on May 13th (that day accounts for about 8% of total posts so far; we’ll get to why in a minute), and note activity on posts spiked before that, on April 24th: the day that character posters were released.
On May 13th, the big spike in posts came from the release of the first trailer for season four, which can be found in the second of ten most popular AD posts. From April up to this week, the most popular posts from the Tumblr discussion came mostly from fan-run Arrested Development focused blogs; half of the top ten posts came from the aptly named The Bluth Company, including the most popular post overall. (Usually seen as a GIF, that moment from the show is just as fun when drawn out into a high-quality photo series.)
And for those familiar with Tumblr’s format, it’s no surprise that photo posts were the most popular: 12.7k of the total 19.1k posts were photo posts, trailed by 3.5k text posts and under 1.5k video posts. The show title was far and away the most popular tag, featured in 11.5k of the total posts.

Lucille naturally gets two tags of her own, even if Tumblr is something she would probably be suspicious of.
Twitter
Out of the total 105.4k tweets made mentioning Arrested Development on Twitter, activity spiked on different days than on Tumblr, with the most contributors (13.9k) sharing the most tweets (16.1k) on May 20th:

Overall since May 14th there have been 65.1k tweets from 75.7k contributors; that averages out to a little over 11.7k tweets a day, with nearly 1.5 tweets per contributor (we imagine those half-tweets wear cutoff shorts all the time, even in the shower). 
The two most retweeted tweets came from unofficial news and quote account bluthquotes and Arrested Development series creator Mitch Hurwitz. They had 2.3k and 2k retweets respectively: 
Really the most burning question all of this has left us with is this: is it May 26th yet? We should probably all use the remaining days to stock up on juice boxes, Cornballers and frozen bananas since we’ll be sleeping through all the Memorial Day cookouts with our families to spend hours with the Bluth clan instead.

My two favorite things - Arrested Development and data. 

unionmetrics:

Arrested Development: talk on Twitter & Tumblr 

One minute after midnight (PDT!) on Sunday, May 26th, Arrested Development (AD) fans will be gathered around their glowing computer screens as the entire fourth season premieres on Netflix. Excited fans have been discussing the countdown to their streaming binges on Twitter and Tumblr, and as Gene Parmesan is unavailable to disclose their discussions with you, you’ll just have to stick with us instead. (Although it’s entirely possible we’re just him in costume.)  

Tumblr

As of yesterday- four days away from the season four premiere- 486.6k Tumblr users generated 19.1k posts with over 1 million notes, since we started tracking on April 22nd. Posts about Arrested Development on Tumblr spiked on May 13th (that day accounts for about 8% of total posts so far; we’ll get to why in a minute), and note activity on posts spiked before that, on April 24th: the day that character posters were released.

image
On May 13th, the big spike in posts came from the release of the first trailer for season four, which can be found in the second of ten most popular AD posts. From April up to this week, the most popular posts from the Tumblr discussion came mostly from fan-run Arrested Development focused blogs; half of the top ten posts came from the aptly named The Bluth Company, including the most popular post overall. (Usually seen as a GIF, that moment from the show is just as fun when drawn out into a high-quality photo series.)

And for those familiar with Tumblr’s format, it’s no surprise that photo posts were the most popular: 12.7k of the total 19.1k posts were photo posts, trailed by 3.5k text posts and under 1.5k video posts. The show title was far and away the most popular tag, featured in 11.5k of the total posts.

image

Lucille naturally gets two tags of her own, even if Tumblr is something she would probably be suspicious of.

Twitter

Out of the total 105.4k tweets made mentioning Arrested Development on Twitter, activity spiked on different days than on Tumblr, with the most contributors (13.9k) sharing the most tweets (16.1k) on May 20th:


image

Overall since May 14th there have been 65.1k tweets from 75.7k contributors; that averages out to a little over 11.7k tweets a day, with nearly 1.5 tweets per contributor (we imagine those half-tweets wear cutoff shorts all the time, even in the shower). image

The two most retweeted tweets came from unofficial news and quote account bluthquotes and Arrested Development series creator Mitch Hurwitz. They had 2.3k and 2k retweets respectively:


image
Really the most burning question all of this has left us with is this: is it May 26th yet? We should probably all use the remaining days to stock up on juice boxes, Cornballers and frozen bananas since we’ll be sleeping through all the Memorial Day cookouts with our families to spend hours with the Bluth clan instead.

My two favorite things - Arrested Development and data. 

Source: unionmetrics

This website maps every recurring joke on Arrested Development

thebluthcompany:

usnews:

This is amazing. 

Source: usnews

Has anyone in this family ever even seen a chicken?

(via its-arrested-development)

Source: its-arrested-development